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National Atomic Testing Museum Debuts New Environmental Management Exhibit, Aug. 2

NATIONAL ATOMIC TESTING MUSEUM TO DEBUT BRAND-NEW EXHIBIT
“BEYOND THE MANHATTAN PROJECT: CLEANING UP THE LEGACY OF
AMERICA’S NUCLEAR DEFENSE AND RESEARCH MISSIONS,” AUG. 2

New Exhibit Created in Partnership with the United States Department of Energy’s
Office of Environmental Management

 

The National Atomic Testing Museum will debut a brand-new joint exhibit in partnership with the United States Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) titled “Beyond the Manhattan Project: Cleaning up the Legacy of America’s Nuclear Defense and Research Missions” on Tuesday, August 2 from 1:45 to 5 p.m. The exhibit will detail the critical work EM does to clean up various sites impacted by five decades of nuclear weapons production and government-sponsored nuclear energy research.

The creation of the brand-new exhibit was inspired by a distinguished lecture held at the museum in July 2021 featuring Todd Shrader, the former principal deputy assistant secretary for EM. In addition to showcasing how the cleanup of contaminated nuclear weapons manufacturing and testing sites is completed, the new exhibit will also increase public awareness of how EM cooperates with local communities to ensure the health and safety of the public and workforce in the United States.

To celebrate the unveiling of this one-of-a-kind exhibit, the NATM and EM invites guests to a grand opening event, including a ribbon cutting and opening remarks by William “Ike” White, senior advisor for EM, as well as an exclusive guided tour by museum curator Parker Arecchi. In addition, the museum invites visitors to explore the array of artifacts and equipment on display, watch a demonstration showing the hydrogeologic principles at play in groundwater systems and enjoy light refreshments during the guest reception

Also available to guests on a first-come, first-served basis will be complimentary pieces of rock salt dating back to the Permian geologic period. Mined from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) 2,150 feet underground, this historic salt harvested from the underground disposal level is more than 250 million years old and is completely safe to touch.

While the ribbon cutting and speaker portions of the program will be open to all visitors, the guided tour and guest reception require advance registration. Guests interested in attending the guided tour and guest reception may RSVP here.

ABOUT THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY’S OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT
The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) mission is to address the nation’s Cold War environmental legacy resulting from five decades of nuclear weapons production and government-sponsored nuclear energy research.  This legacy includes some of the world’s most dangerous radioactive sites with large amounts of radioactive wastes, spent nuclear fuel (SNF), excess plutonium and uranium, thousands of contaminated facilities, and contaminated soil and groundwater.  Created in 1989, EM has the responsibility for completing the cleanup of this Cold War legacy and managing the remaining nuclear materials.

ABOUT NATIONAL ATOMIC TESTING MUSEUM
The National Atomic Testing Museum (NATM) is operated and maintained by its parent company, the Nevada Test Site Historical Foundation (NTSHF), an IRS 501(c)3 charitable, non-profit organization chartered in Nevada. NATM is one of 37 museums designated as an Affiliate Partner of the Smithsonian Institution and is a repository for one of the most comprehensive collections of nuclear history in the world. Covering nuclear history beginning with the first test at the Nevada Test Site on January 27, 1951, NATM’s exhibitions and programming also address current affairs related to the nuclear industry.  For more information, go to www.nationalatomictestingmuseum.org and follow on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter

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National Atomic Testing Museum Debuts New Environmental Management Exhibit, Aug. 2
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National Atomic Testing Museum Debuts New Environmental Management Exhibit, Aug. 2