Brooklyn Bowl To Host Sturgill Simpson. April 23

Brooklyn Bowl

STURGILL SIMPSON
WITH VERY SPECIAL GUESTS THE LONE BELLOW

Brooklyn Bowl Las Vegas at The LINQ
3545 Las Vegas Blvd. South
THURSDAY, APRIL 23, 2015 – 8:00 PM

TICKETS ON SALE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2015 at 10:00 AM PST!!!

Brooklyn Bowl Las Vegas, recently named “Best Live Music Venue” by Las Vegas Weekly and “Best New Venue” by Vegas Seven, is thrilled to announce Sturgill Simpson live at Brooklyn Bowl Las Vegas.

Show: Sturgill Simpson with very special guests The Lone Bellow
Support: TBD
Show Date: Thursday, April 23, 2015
Times: Doors 7:00 PM || Show 8:00 PM
Ages: 18+ with ID welcome
Ticket Prices: General admission tickets $20 ADV // $22 DOS plus applicable service charges
Ticket Info: Tickets are available online at www.ticketfly.com, vegas.brooklynbowl.com, or to charge tickets by phone, call 702.862.2695. Tickets available also at the Brooklyn Bowl Las Vegas box office open daily at noon. 

Sturgill Simpson - vegas24seven

ABOUT STURGILL SIMPSON:
Sturgill Simpson’s authenticity stands out like an island of hope in a sea of tacky. Bonafide mountain hillbilly soul, as pure as you are going to find anywhere. All it takes is one listen to FINALLY understand.

THE LONE BELLOW

ABOUT THE LONE BELLOW:
Then Came the Morning, the second album by the Southern-born, Brooklyn-based indie-folk trio the Lone Bellow, opens with a crest of churchly piano, a patter of drums, and a fanfare of voices harmonizing like a sunrise. It’s a powerful introduction, enormous and overwhelming, as Zach Williams, Brian Elmquist, and Kanene Pipkin testify mightily to life’s great struggles and joys, heralding the morning that dispels the dark night: “Then came the morning! It was bright, like the light that you kept from your smile!” Working with producer Aaron Dessner of the National, the Lone Bellow has created a sound that mixes folk sincerity, gospel fervor, even heavy metal thunder, but the heart of the band is harmony: three voices united in a lone bellow. 

“The feeling I get singing with Zach and Brian is completely natural and wholly electrifying,” says Kanene. “Our voices feel like they were made to sing together.”

Long before they combined their voices, the three members of the Lone Bellow were singing on their own. Brian had been writing and recording as a solo artist for more than a decade, with three albums under his own name. Kanene and her husband Jason were living in Beijing, China, hosting open mic nights, playing at local clubs and teaching music lessons. Zach began writing songs in the wake of a family tragedy: After his wife was thrown from a horse, he spent days in the hospital at her bedside, bracing for the worst news. The journal he kept during this period would eventually become his first batch of songs as a solo artist. Happily, his wife made a full recovery.

When Kanene’s brother asked her and Zach to sing “O Happy Day” together at his wedding, they discovered their voices fit together beautifully, but starting a band together seemed impossible when they lived on opposite sides of the world. Brian soon relocated to New York and Kanene moved there to attend culinary school a couple years later. The three got together in their new hometown to work on a few songs of Zach’s, he’d been chipping away at the scene as a solo artist for awhile by then. After hitting those first harmonies did they decide to abandon all other pursuits. Soon the trio was playing all over the city, although they considered Rockwood Music Hall on the Lower East Side to be their home. They opened for the Civil Wars, Dwight Yokam, Brandi Carlile and the Avett Brothers, and their self-titled debut, produced by Nashville’s Charlie Peacock (the Civil Wars, Holly Williams) and released in January 2013, established them as one of the boldest new acts in the Americana movement.

After two hard years of constant touring, the band was exhausted but excited. By 2014, they had written nearly 40 songs on the road and were eager to get them down on tape. After putting together a list of dream producers, they reached out to their first choice, the National guitarist Aaron Dessner, who has helmed albums by the L.A. indie-rock group Local Natives and New York singer-songwriter Sharon Van Etten.

“It occurred to me that it would be fun to get together and make music with them,” says Aaron. “My main interest in producing records is community and friendship more than making money. I already do a lot of traveling and working with the National, so when I have to time to work with other artists, it should be fun and meaningful.”

“Aaron is just so kind,” Zach says. “And he has surrounded himself with all these incredibly talented people, like Jonathan Low, the engineer. His brother Bryce [Dessner, also a guitarist for the National] wrote these amazing brass and string arrangements, and he got some of his friends to play with us.”

Dessner and the Lone Bellow spent two weeks recording at Dreamland in upstate New York, a nineteenth-century church that had been converted into a homey studio. The singers found the space to inspire the emotional gravity necessary for the material and the acoustics they were looking for. (For Kanene, Dreamland had one other bonus: “I’m a big Muppets fan, and it looks exactly like the church where Dr. Teeth and the Electric Mayhem lived.”)

Aaron set them up in a circle in what had once been the sanctuary, with microphones hanging in the rafters to capture the sound of their voices bleeding together. Most of the vocals were recorded in single takes, a tactic that adds urgency to songs like “Heaven Don’t Call Me Home” and “If You Don’t Love Me.” “There were a couple of times when somebody sang the wrong word or hit a bad note, and we just had to keep going,” says Zach, who says that recording “Marietta” in particular was daunting—especially the moment near the end when he hits an anguished high note, bends it even higher, and holds it for an impossibly long time. It’s a startling display of vocal range, but it’s also almost unbearably raw in its emotional honesty.

“‘Marietta’ is probably the darkest song on the whole record,” Zach explains, “and it’s based on something that happened between my wife and me. The band was getting ready to record that song when all of a sudden my wife showed up with our youngest baby. It was a great surprise, a beautiful moment. So I was able to go out and sing that song, knowing she was there to help me carry the moment.”

“These are true stories,” says Brian. “These aren’t things we made up. We tried to write some songs that had nothing to do with our personal stories, but we just didn’t respond to them. But we’re best buds, so we know each others’ personal stuff and trust each other to figure out what needs to be said and how to say it.” Case in point: Brian wrote “Call to War” about his own struggles during his twenties, but gave the song to Kanene to sing. “The content is painful and brutal,” she says, “but the imagery, the vocals, they build something delicate and ethereal. That kind of contrast illuminates the true beauty and power of a song.”

Says Brian, “We do this one thing together, and we carry each other. Hopefully that makes the listener want to be a part of it. It becomes a communal thing, which means that there’s never a sad song to sing. It’s more a celebration of the light and the dark.”

ABOUT BROOKLYN BOWL:
Brooklyn Bowl Las Vegas is the brand’s third location. With three levels spanning over 80,000 square feet, Brooklyn Bowl Las Vegas is one of the largest performance venues in America and is described by People Magazine as being “on the fast path to being Vegas’ über cool place.” Located at The LINQ, the open-air district in the center of the Las Vegas Strip, the multi-dimensional space boasts 32 lanes of bowling, five on-site bars and rockin’ comfort food by the world-renowned Bromberg Brothers’ Blue Ribbon Restaurants, including their iconic Fried Chicken celebrated on Food Network’s “The Best Thing I Ever Ate.” On any given night, more than 2,000 concertgoers can enjoy live music programming from the general admission area, the luxurious bowlers’ lounges adjacent to the lanes, or the private lounge boxes overlooking it all. Since opening in March 2014, Brooklyn Bowl Las Vegas has seen notable performances by Elvis Costello & The Roots, Jane’s Addiction, Phil Lesh & Friends, Primus, O.A.R. and 21 Pilots.

The original location opened in the Williamsburg neighborhood of Brooklyn in 2009 in the former Hecla Iron Works building (built in 1882) and was the first L.E.E.D. certified bowling alley in the world. Brooklyn Bowl New York has hosted countless notable performances, including shows by Kanye West, Adele, Paul Simon, Moby and Guns N’Roses and has been named Zagat’s “Best Music Venue – New York City” for three consecutive years (as well as “Best Bowling Alley” and “Best Brooklyn Venue”) and one of the best clubs in America by Rolling Stone.  Eater described their menu as “epic,” while The New Yorker hailed the club’s unprecedented combination of top-flight music, beer, bowling, and food as “like nailing a spare on a four-ten split.” The second Brooklyn Bowl location opened in January 2014 at The O2 in London, and was hailed by The London Evening Standard as a “…wonderland of food, drink, music and pins”.

For additional information about Brooklyn Bowl, including the most up-to-date show lineup, visit www.brooklynbowl.com. If you would like to be added to our email list for first information about upcoming shows email LasVegasNewsletter@BrooklynBowl.com.

Brooklyn Bowl Las Vegas is located at The LINQ, next to the High Roller Observation Wheel on the world-famous Las Vegas Strip.

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Brooklyn Bowl To Host Sturgill Simpson. April 23
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Brooklyn Bowl Las Vegas, is thrilled to announce Sturgill Simpson live at Brooklyn Bowl Las Vegas.
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